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Ask the Introvert: Introverts are passionate voters and can inspire others to vote, too

Voting combines ideas, passion and action in a powerfully quiet way. No wonder introspective introverts are natural fans.
sharon glassman ask the introvert thumb
Sharon Glassman (Photo courtesy of Sharon Glassman)

What’s an introvert? How does introversion effect us at work and play? In our friendships? In our search for meaning and happiness?

I’ll explore these and other timely questions about introvert life in this column, as an introvert entrepreneur, artist and journalist. 

Want to ask a question? Just use the email below.

PS.: even if you don’t think of yourself as introverted, you may find some helpful info here. Why? Because, to paraphrase Ben Franklin: we assume our differences divide us. Only to find we share common ground.

Today’s introvert-astic question: Why are introverts naturally engaged voters?

Voting combines ideas, passion and action in a powerfully quiet way. No wonder introspective introverts are natural fans.

Read on to find out how innie brains rock the vote.

Bonus: Get a free, nonpartisan Introvert Voter button at Longmont Public Media Monday through Friday. See end of column for details.

Analytical choices are such an innie thing

If everyday life were a superhero movie, the introvert superhero’s superpower wouldn’t be leaping over tall buildings or spinning a web. It would be, you guessed it: analysis. 

And yes, watching Super Introvert deploy their deep thinking wouldn’t look as exciting as a traditional action movie scene.

In a typical scenario, we might see Super Introvert, dressed in their trademark comfy attire, rearranging their bookshelves by subject matter. Or stacking the boxes of tea in their cupboard according to the time of day they’re quaffed. Our innie hero’s mission: to defeat the powers of chaos with heartfelt logic.

During election season, introverts use these same powers of induction, introspection and quiet involvement to cast their ballots. On the civic level, voting makes individual introverts part of a larger civic whole.

Voting offers neurobiological benefits, too. Supporting individuals and issues we believe in can activate our parasympathetic nervous system, creating feelings of physical calm.

So far, so awesome. Voting connects introverts to important issues, and our community, state and country. It makes us feel good. And can be done silently.

But before we form a stereotypical image of the introvert voter as someone who’s too timid to be an activist or candidate, consider these real-life innie heroes.

Quietly civic-minded

Thanks to a friend in Pennsylvania, I recently heard U.S. Rep. Dwight Evans (D-Pa.) deliver an experienced statesman talk over Zoom to newer state and local candidates.

I don’t know if congressman Evans is officially introverted. But his message about how to approach public service was. 

Listen to your colleagues, he advised candidates and organizers on the call. Stop talking about your plans and hear your constituents. Consider what you’ve heard. And act on it.

Later that night, while paging through Wired magazine, I came across a profile of Stacey Abrams. Turns out she’s is an introvert. 

Yep. That Stacey Abrams. The one who ran for Georgia governor and started a voter support organization Fair Fight.

“So often, people who have my personality type, my introversion, they shy away from this work,” Abrams said. But her commitment to helping her community outweighed her fear of knocking on doors, she told Wired.

Think deeply, act kindly

Yes, introverts are passionate voters. And can inspire others to vote, too.

To help Longmont innies celebrate and communicate voting’s “in-portance” (yep, that’s a word now), we’re giving away free Introvert Voter buttons downtown this week only. Your button will sing you an introvert voter power song, too. Just use the QR code or web link on the design.

2020_10_11_LL_introvert_voter_button_front_ask_the_introvertFree introvert voter buttons will be available from noon to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at Longmont Public Media, 475 Fourth Ave.(Photo courtesy of Sharon Glassman)

Get your free Introvert Voter button from noon to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at Longmont Public Media, 475 Fourth Avenue.

And like the song says: Vote. Vote. Vote.

Have a question about introvert life? Write to askin@smilesongs.com.

Sharon Glassman is a Longmont-based introvert lifestyle journalist and creator of Smile Songs gifts. The thoughts and opinions offered in this column are intended for entertainment and informational purposes only. Use of this column is not intended to replace or substitute for any professional, financial, medical, legal, or other professional advice.

The Longmont Leader accepts contributions, photos, and op-eds for publication from community members, business leaders and public officials on local topics. Publication will be at the discretion of the editor and published opinions do not represent the views of The Longmont Leader or its staff. To submit a contribution, email info@longmontleader.com.



Sharon Glassman

About the Author: Sharon Glassman

Sharon Glassman is a Longmont-based introvert lifestyle journalist and creator of Smile Songs gifts.
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