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Sheriff's office reminds residents of Boulder County fire restrictions as July 4 approaches

Fire restrictions are in place in unincorporated western Boulder County, including mountain areas, and no fireworks of any kind are allowed.
2020_06_27_LL_BoCo_fire_restrictions
The red area of this map shows the area of Boulder County in which fire restrictions are in place. (Courtesy of Boulder County Sheriff's Office)

With the July 4 weekend approaching, the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office is asking those heading to the hills for the holiday to leave their fireworks behind. 

Fire restrictions are in place in unincorporated western Boulder County, including mountain areas, and no fireworks of any kind are allowed, the sheriff’s office stated in a news release. Areas included in the fire restrictions are: 

  • West of Colo. 93 from its intersection with the southern boundary of Boulder County until, and including, its intersection with Colo. 119.

  • West of Broadway Avenue in Boulder, from its intersection with Colo. 119 until, and including, its intersection with U.S. 36.

  • West of U.S. 36, from its intersection with Broadway Avenue until its intersection with the northern boundary of Boulder County.

  • West of the western boundary of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space until, and including U.S. 36.

  • All of the Rabbit Mountain Open Space property.

In areas without restrictions, only those fireworks that do not explode or leave the ground are legal statewide. In Longmont city limits, all fireworks, including sparklers, are illegal on city streets and golf courses and in parks and other public areas.

Legal fireworks include cylindrical or cone fountains, wheels and ground spinners; illuminating torches and colored fire, dipped sticks and sparklers; toy propellant or toy smoke devices; trick noisemakers and snake or glow worms, according to the sheriff’s office. 

A full list of what is allowed and not allowed under state law can be found here.

Penalties for violating fireworks laws can include fines of up to $750, six months in prison or both, according to the sheriff’s office.

In Longmont, police are asking residents to make their neighborhoods “voluntary fireworks-free zones.” 

Fireworks complaints can be difficult to enforce, according to Longmont Deputy Police Chief Jeff Satur, because often they do not include exact locations and there oftentimes are delays in responding to them.

Residents are asked not to call 911 to report fireworks violations. Violations can be reported by calling the Longmont Emergency Communications Center at 303-651-8501. Callers can choose to remain anonymous or be identified in the course of the complaint.




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